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News from Asia

Regional News from Stanford University - Asia

News Item Stanford graduate advocates for disability rights and empowerment in Thailand

When Oranicha (Natty) Jumreornvong decided to leave her home in Thailand to attend Stanford University, her family was uneasy about her decision. Jumreornvong explained in a Stanford News story:

They were concerned that the academic challenges of Stanford and cultural differences between Thailand and the U.S. would be too much for a daughter. Looking back, I understand that their disagreement with my academic choices was out of love.

News Item “Why did I write the book? Essentially, I had to”: A surgeon reflects on his time in Vietnam

For Christmas in 1982, Henry Ward Trueblood’s wife, Nancy, gave him a book about the 1965 Battle of Ia Drang, the first major engagement between U.S. and North Vietnamese forces. The battle took place shortly after Trueblood, MD, arrived for a yearlong tour of duty in Vietnam, having been drafted as a Navy surgeon during his second year of residency. Nearly two decades later, Trueblood took one look at the book cover and began to cry.

News Item From the classroom into the world

Global Studies internships in Cambodia give Stanford students life-changing experiences abroad in the field of human rights and international justice.

News Item Climate change and health: A snapshot from Stanford Health Policy

Working in communications at Stanford Health Policy, I spend a lot of time reading about health research. But to be honest, much of our research doesn’t affect me directly. Breast cancer, statins and Medicare coverage may factor into my life someday, but while I’m still in my 2os and mercifully healthy, I’m somewhat removed from many of the health concerns that affect millions of Americans.

But sometimes, I come across studies that affect everyone — and, in my view, nothing has a greater health impact than climate change.

News Item Helping China Identify and Protect Areas of High Ecological Importance

China leads the world in greenhouse gas emissions. Its biggest cities are shrouded in smog. And the country’s population is 1.4 billion people and growing. At least to the rest of the world, China isn’t known as a leader in environmental mindfulness.

Research from Gretchen Daily, professor of biology at Stanford University, is helping to change that.

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