Skip to content Skip to navigation

Search results

Featured Research from Stanford University

Search results

Project Broadband Salton Seismic Imaging Project (bb-SSIP), Stanford

Principal Investigator:

The Salton Trough was formed by past and current relative motions of the Pacific and North American tectonic plates. In its northern edge, the right-lateral transform boundary of the San Andreas Fault system turns into the divergent motion of the East Pacific Rise, which continues south through the Gulf of California. The Salton Trough is highly active: it exhibits a high rate of seismicity; contains major active faults; and geothermal activity is evident on the surface.

Project Sedimentology, Palaeoenvironment and Diagenesis of the Tertiary Burqan Formation in the Midyan area, Saudi Arabia: Implications for subsurface reservoir quality., King Fahd University of Petroleum and Minerals (KFUMP), Saudi Arabia

Principal Investigator:

The project involves a group of 5 professional geologists aimed at studying the sedimentation, diagenesis, and reservoir architecture and quality of syn-rift Miocene deep-water strata in the Midyan area, northwestern Saudi Arabia.

Location

Saudi Arabia

Project Stanford Project on Cross-border Human Trafficking: China, Myanmar, Thailand

Principal Investigator:

This research is a multidisciplinary study of human migration and human trafficking along China’s shared border with Myanmar and neighboring Thailand, with an emphasis on trafficking of children, bride trafficking, and unsafe labor migration among women and other especially vulnerable groups. Our research provides a detailed examination of the legislative, policy, and agency responses from China, Myanmar and Thailand’s governments as they institute anti-trafficking measures to combat human trafficking across their borders.

Project Solar Market Gardens as a Tool for Rural Development, Stanford University (7/1/2010 - Present)

Principal Investigator:

Since 2007, FSE has been evaluating the livelihood and environmental impacts of an effort led by a US-based NGO, the Solar Electric Light Fund (SELF), to use solar arrays to power irrigation pumps for growing high-valued crops (solar market gardens) in the dry season in Northern Benin. We found that photovoltaic technology yields substantial (and significant) benefits in the form of household income and nutritional intake, and is cost-competitive in the medium term, especially where fuel supplies are unreliable.

Pages