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Featured Research from Stanford University

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Project Solar Market Gardens as a Tool for Rural Development, Stanford University (7/1/2010 - Present)

Principal Investigator:

Since 2007, FSE has been evaluating the livelihood and environmental impacts of an effort led by a US-based NGO, the Solar Electric Light Fund (SELF), to use solar arrays to power irrigation pumps for growing high-valued crops (solar market gardens) in the dry season in Northern Benin. We found that photovoltaic technology yields substantial (and significant) benefits in the form of household income and nutritional intake, and is cost-competitive in the medium term, especially where fuel supplies are unreliable.

Project Lead Contaminated Topsoil and Food in Rural Bangladesh, Stanford University (July 1, 2013 - Present)

Principal Investigator:

Human exposure to lead in the environment causes irreversible impairment of intellectual function. In Bangladesh, where some rural residents have unexpectedly high levels of lead in their blood, the source is proving difficult to pinpoint. This project will evaluate the severity of lead poisoning in rural Bangladesh and identify the pathway of exposure to help develop focused prevention strategies.

Project The Importance of Marine Fisheries and Ecosystems for Food In China, Stanford University (September 1, 2013 - Present)

Principal Investigator:

Given China’s demographic changes, evolving nutritional requirements, and dominant role in global fisheries, the key question is whether marine ecosystems can be managed adequately to support the country’s future vision for domestic food security. The symposium will be directed toward research on the provision of wild fish for direct human consumption and for animal feeds.

Project Innovating Disaster Microinsurance for Local Market Recovery, Stanford University

Principal Investigator:

The recovery of local markets is critical to moving from an immediate relief to recovery phase in humanitarian crises. Often, very small and micro-enterprises (SMEs) comprise the markets for goods and services that the urban poor use. Recovering these markets may improve livelihood and market restoration making disaster relief easier and more cost-effective. Unfortunately, these SMEs are excluded from access to risk financing in the form of insurance.

Project Urban Slum Vulnerability and Indicator Development for Slow Onset Urban Emergencies (IDSUE), Concern Worldwide (2013 - Present)

Principal Investigator:

The world is rapidly urbanizing with the majority of the world’s population now living in urban areas. In many rapidly urbanizing cities, the slum population now makes up over 60% of the urban populace. This demographic transition is creating complex urban landscapes with disproportionately large slums that concentrate hazards and vulnerabilities to natural and man-made disasters.

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