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News from Africa

Regional News from Stanford University - Africa

News Item Stanford data analyst’s childhood inspires his research: A Q&A

Data analysts are critical to medical research — particularly to epidemiology studies that look at the incidence, distribution and determinants of health conditions in specific populations. So I was happy to have the opportunity to speak with Jonathan Altamirano, a research data analyst in Stanford’s Global Child Health Program.

How did you get involved in global health research?

News Item In Uganda, women with heart disease shown to take great risks to have a family

Some Ugandan women are knowingly risking their lives in order to have children, a new study has found. Thousands of women in the East African country suffer from rheumatic heart disease, which has been largely eradicated in the developed world but is common in developing countries.

Women with the disease who become pregnant can suffer many complications, including blood clots, arrhythmias, heart failure and death. And those who take blood-thinning medications can risk having children born with birth defects.

News Item A cheaper, faster, more reliable test for TB developed by Stanford researchers

For most Americans, tuberculosis is something you read about in history books, not something you experience first or even second hand. But in developing countries, it remains a real threat to public health, in part because there's no simple, reliable test for the bacteria that causes TB that works in clinics with limited resources.

News Item A small African country with a powerful voice

The recent film “A United Kingdom” tells the story of Botswana’s maverick first president who defied convention and caused an international scandal by marrying a British woman he met as a law student at Oxford. Seretse Khama, who went on to become a revered figure, set the tone for the country’s progressive policies, which I glimpsed while on a recent visit to the small southern African nation.

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