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News from Asia

Regional News from Stanford University - Asia

News Item Rising mountains dried out Central Asia

The uplift of two mountain ranges in Central Asia beginning 30 million years ago expanded the Gobi Desert and set Central Asia on its path to extreme aridity, a Stanford study suggests.

News Item New source of arsenic threatens groundwater in Vietnam

"Dig deep" to avoid naturally occurring arsenic contamination has been promoted as an answer to obtaining safe water in South Asia, which has experienced mass poisoning. But arsenic has been found in numerous deep wells drilled in the Mekong Delta region of southern Vietnam. Stanford Earth scientists suggest that the contamination occurs as arsenic is squeezed from ancient clay sediments surrounding the wells.

News Item Japan's Post-Nuclear Energy Future

In the wake of the Fukushima disaster, nuclear-dependent Japan began shutting down its other reactors. Toshiya Okamura, a Tokyo Gas executive and visiting scholar at Stanford University, explains how the country survived the summer, and expresses deep concerns about this winter and his country's energy future.

News Item Unusual earthquake gave Japan tsunami extra punch, Stanford scientists say

The earthquake and tsunami that hit Japan on March 11 were generated on a fault that didn't rupture in the usual fashion, according to a study by researchers at Stanford University and the University of Tokyo. The rupture initially shot westward, then slowed markedly in that direction while the fault began rupturing rapidly eastward. The "flip-flop" fault motion first shook Honshu violently, then deformed seafloor sediments on the fault plane with such force that they triggered the huge tsunami.

News Item Unusual earthquake gave Japan tsunami extra punch, Stanford scientists say

The earthquake and tsunami that hit Japan on March 11 were generated on a fault that didn't rupture in the usual fashion, according to a study by researchers at Stanford University and the University of Tokyo. The rupture initially shot westward, then slowed markedly in that direction while the fault began rupturing rapidly eastward. The "flip-flop" fault motion first shook Honshu violently, then deformed seafloor sediments on the fault plane with such force that they triggered the huge tsunami.

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