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2018 Archives

International News from Stanford University - 2018

News Item Fishing's Global Footprint

Seafood provides sustenance for billions of people and livelihoods for tens of millions, yet the full global reach of high seas fishing has remained largely a mystery until now. A team of researchers, including Stanford scientists, has directly quantified industrial fishing’s footprint using satellites and onboard ship-locating technology.

Their data reveal, among other surprises, that five countries account for more than 85 percent of high seas fishing, and holidays affect fishing patterns much more than fish migrations or ocean conditions.

News Item Stanford researchers show how mental rehearsal prepares our minds for action

The Winter Olympics are here again, and you know what that means: lots and lots of mental rehearsal, that thing where athletes picture themselves swooping around the gates of a downhill skiing course, spinning in mid air above a skating rink, and vigorously sweeping the ice with a broom (which is what you would do if you were into curling).

Psychologists — not to mention those athletes — know that mental rehearsal works, in the sense that picturing yourself doing something before you actually do it improves your chances of success or, if you're an Olympic athlete, a gold medal.

News Item What Happens if We Don't Meet Paris Agreement Goals?

The individual commitments made by parties of the United Nations Paris Agreement are not enough to fulfill the agreement’s overall goal of limiting global temperature rise to less than 2 degrees Celsius above pre-industrial levels. The difference between the U.N. goal and the actual country commitments is a mere 1 C, which may seem negligible. But a study from Stanford University, published Feb. 14 in Science Advances, finds that even that 1-degree difference could increase the likelihood of extreme weather.

News Item How Will Small-Scale Fisheries Fare in a Changing Climate?

Nations and territories on small islands in the Pacific Ocean are likely to be some of the most drastically affected by global climate change. That’s because these communities depend heavily on nearshore, small-scale catches of fish, crustaceans and other marine populations that are likely to be disrupted by changing ocean temperatures and loss of coral reefs. These fisheries are also pillars of cultural and economic independence in impoverished and marginalized areas.

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