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Developing Interventions to End Cycles of Poverty Caused by Taenia solium and Neurocysticercosis, China

Neurocysticercosis is a neglected infectious disease caused by larval forms of the pig tapeworm, Taenia solium, infecting people's brains. In our exploratory work in impoverished areas of Western China focusing on disease prevalence and burden in children, we have identified widespread disease, including brain infections and resulting cognitive deficits. We hope to identify transmission pathways and pilot interventions that will reduce transmission.

Location

China

Principal Investigator:

John Openshaw

Current Research Interests: 
I am interested in the intersection between infectious disease and ecology and my current research is on detecting emerging zoonotic pathogens. Zoonotic disease represents a major burden to human health: from the bubonic plague of the middle ages, to the 1918 flu pandemic that infected one third of the world’s population, to the modern Human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) epidemic which affects 34 million people living today. My current work aims to detect viral spillover events from animals to humans with the hope of eventually understanding the ecology that drives this process and better...
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