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Tracing zoonotic disease risks and immunological adaptations in bats, humans and human commensals across the Central American countryside, Stanford University (1/1/2015 - Present)

Bats have been identified as the reservoirs for a number of emerging infectious diseases but most of these pathogens have coevolved with their hosts for long periods of time without causing issue. We are seeking to understand the potential sources, sinks and pathways of zoonotic infection in a countryside landscape that is home to one of the most diverse bat faunas in the world by examining bats and livestock as well as surveying human behavior.

Location

Costa Rica

Collaborators

  • Scott Boyd, Assistant Professor of Pathology at the Stanford University Medical Center, Stanford University
  • John Openshaw, Instructor, Medicine - Infectious Diseases, School of Medicine Stanford University
  • Pablo Ortiz, Head of Emergency Department, San Vito Hospital

Principal Investigator:

Elizabeth Hadly

Current Research Interests: 
ELIZABETH A. HADLY
PROFESSOR, DEPARTMENT OF BIOLOGY AND DEPARTMENT OF GEOLOGICAL SCIENCES, BY COURTESY

Professor Hadly uses a combined field and laboratory approach to examine how ecological perturbations link or decouple levels of biological organization, because understanding the links among ecosystems, species, populations and genes is central to understanding how organisms exist, evolve and become extinct. She addresses problems in organismal biology from both evolutionary and ecological perspectives, primarily using extant mammals. One of the unique aspects of her overall...
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